​Sheriff's Officers receive national recognition

Issued: Friday, 4 December 2015

For the first time in Australia, NSW Sheriff’s Officers will receive National Medals for their long and diligent service to improving the safety of the justice system.

Attorney General Gabrielle Upton will present medals to 10 Sheriff’s Officers at a ceremony at the Downing Centre Courthouse in Sydney today. They are among 74 Sheriff’s Officers to receive National Medals this year.

“Sheriff’s Officers are unsung heroes who work hard to protect our courts,” Ms Upton said.

“These awards honour veteran Sheriff’s Officers who have served the justice system and the community with distinction.”

The National Medal was established in 1975 to recognise members of government and voluntary organisations who risk their lives or safety to protect and assist the community such as police, ambulance and corrective services officers.

NSW Sheriff Tracey Hall said Sheriff’s Officers must have served at least 15 years to be eligible for the medal.

“In total, the 74 award recipients have worked an incredible 1,240 years between them, which proves that being a Sheriff’s Officer is a long and rewarding career,” said Ms Hall.

Today’s ceremony will also include the swearing in of the final members of a group of 40 new Sheriff’s Officers who have been appointed to further strengthen court security as part of the NSW Government’s countering violent extremism (CVE) response.

There are now more than 240 specially trained Sheriff’s Officers employed at 58 offices across the State servicing 160 courts.

Other duties of Sheriff’s Officers include administering the jury service system, an operation that involves working with more than 200,000 people every year and carrying out a range of law enforcement duties such as executing warrants, writs and other orders issued by courts and tribunals.

The Office of the NSW Sheriff has existed for more than 190 years.

For more information on the National Medal go to: www.itsanhonour.gov.au