​Kings Cross id scanners help fight crime

Isssued:Monday, 10 August 2015  [PDF,129kb]

One year after their introduction, ID scanners are helping NSW Police tackle crime in Sydney’s most notorious night spot, contributing to a 32% reduction in alcohol related assaults.

Through the Liberals & Nationals Government tough liquor laws ID scanners are required by law in all high-risk venues within the Kings Cross entertainment precinct and after their first 12 months over 1.5 million IDs have been scanned.

Deputy Premier and Minister for Justice and Police Troy Grant said the intelligence from scanners has helped police reduce crime inside licensed venues and surrounding streets.

"Scanners are not only a deterrent for known troublemakers but the information they collect is also being used to identify offenders for crimes committed inside and outside licensed venues," Mr Grant said.

"If you do the wrong thing in the Cross, remember this - we know who you are, what you look like and we will find you and charge you.

"For the vast majority of people who do the right thing a night out in the Cross is much safer and more enjoyable thanks to the use of these scanners."

Kings Cross Police Local Area Commander Superintendent Michael Fitzgerald said ID scanners have played a monumental role in improving the safety and security of Kings Cross.

"Since their introduction, we have seen a marked reduction in the number of assaults and thefts from within licensed premises," Mr Fitzgerald said.

"Furthermore, they have also allowed police to quickly identify and track down people who commit crimes within Kings Cross' pubs and clubs, and proven immensely effective in helping police enforce banning orders."

To date 208 long term banning orders of up to 12 months have been issued. ID scanners have detected 17 breaches of long term banning orders.

Additionally, 223 temporary 48-hour banning orders have been issued with six breaches detected by the ID scanners.

Please find some examples of crime detected by ID scanners below.

Jarrad Schwark 0429 234 308

Some examples of crime detected by the ID scanners

  • A woman was fined $1,000 and sentenced to a 12 month good behaviour bond after throwing a plastic glass at another female patron during an altercation at a hotel, breaking the patron’s nose and cutting her face. Police identified the woman by using ID scanner information and CCTV footage.
  • A man had his jaw broken and was knocked unconscious after being allegedly coward punched following an argument with two men at a fast food outlet. Police later used ID scanner information and CCTV from a nearby nightclub to identify one of the accused men who fled from the scene, and he was later charged with recklessly inflicting grievous bodily harm.
  • Two women were charged after allegedly assaulting a male patron at a bar. After being asked to leave, the argument restarted outside with one women punching the man in the face, shattering his glasses, causing a cut to the cornea of his left eye and requiring 12 stitches to his face. ID scanner information and CCTV helped identify the two women.
  • There have been 17 breaches of long term banning orders detected by the ID scanners. Breaches of long term banning orders can result in a $2,200 penalty notice or maximum court imposed fines of up to $11,000.
  • There have been six breaches of temporary 48-hour banning orders detected by the ID scanners. Breaches of short term banning orders can result in a $550 penalty notice or maximum court imposed fines of up to $5,500.